An archive of this Sojourner's Journey – Reflections, book reviews, and other random thoughts

Book Review: The Weaver’s Daughter

About the Book:

Kate’s loyalties bind her to the past. Henry’s loyalties compel him to strive for a better future. In a landscape torn between tradition and vision, can two souls find the strength to overcome their preconceptions?

Loyalty has been at the heart of the Dearborne family for as long as Kate can remember, but a war is brewing in their small village, one that has the power to rip families asunder — including her own. As misguided actions are brought to light, she learns how deep her father’s pride and bitterness run, and she begins to wonder if her loyalty is well-placed.

Henry Stockton, heir to the Stockton fortune, returns home from three years at war hoping to find a refuge from his haunting memories. Determined to bury the past, he embraces his grandfather’s goals to modernize his family’s wool mill, regardless of the grumblings from the local weavers. When tragedy strikes shortly after his arrival, Henry must sort out the truth from suspicion if he is to protect his family’s livelihood and legacy.

Henry has been warned about the Dearborne family. Kate, too, has been advised to stay far away from the Stocktons, but chance meetings continue to bring her to Henry’s side, blurring the jagged lines between loyalty, justice, and truth. Kate ultimately finds herself with the powerful decision that will forever affect her village’s future. As unlikely adversaries, Henry and Kate must come together to find a way to create peace for their families, and their village, and their souls – even if it means risking their hearts in the process.

My Thoughts:

This regency novel has little to do with the ballroom setting you might expect from this genre and instead focuses on the political and social upheaval in England’s wool and weaving industry in the early 1800s.  Prejudice, bitterness and an inability to listen to any viewpoint other than your own are all aspects addressed within this plot.  Love, friendship, loyalty, forgiveness and gender roles are also strong themes.

The plot was fast moving and engaging.  I must admit to a high level of frustration with the stubbornness and narrow-minded thinking of some of the characters, which I believe was the author’s intent.  The love interest in the story wasn’t overdone, which I appreciated.

As for the fact that this book is marketed by a Christian publisher I have to say that this book is not a book that is presenting a gospel message.  The novel is merely reflective of the times when it speaks of church.  The author speaks of right, wrong and moral living, as well as forgiveness, but the gospel or any type of intimate relationship with God is absent from the story.

And, I’m happy to say that there was not a single kidnapping in the novel.  I’ve a running joke with a friend that all the regency novels I’ve read over the past few years have included at least one abduction, so the fact that it was absent from this plot made me very happy.

All in all it was an interesting read.

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I received a free digital galley of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

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