An archive of this Sojourner's Journey – Reflections, book reviews, and other random thoughts

Book Review: Everything She Didn’t Say

About the Book:

In 1911, Carrie Strahorn wrote a memoir entitled Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage, which shared some of the most exciting events of 25 years of traveling and shaping the American West with her husband, Robert Strahorn, a railroad promoter, investor, and writer. That is all fact. Everything She Didn’t Say imagines Carrie nearly ten years later as she decides to write down what was really on her mind during those adventurous nomadic years.

Certain that her husband will not read it, and in fact that it will only be found after her death, Carrie is finally willing to explore the lessons she learned along the way, including the danger a woman faces of losing herself within a relationship with a strong-willed man and the courage it takes to accept her own God-given worth apart from him. Carrie discovers that wealth doesn’t insulate a soul from pain and disappointment, family is essential, pioneering is a challenge, and western landscapes are both demanding and nourishing. Most of all, she discovers that home can be found, even in a rootless life.

With a deft hand, New York Times bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick draws out the emotions of living–the laughter and pain, the love and loss–to give readers a window not only into the past, but into their own conflicted hearts. Based on a true story.

My Thoughts:

I’m not entirely sure what to say about this book.  On one hand, it was a creative and honest “behind the scenes” imagining of the life behind the facts.  The book was well written and contained some helpful relational wisdom.  I found the overview of Carrie Strahorn’s life fascinating.  And yet, the book was easy to walk away from and in many ways it was a sad story of a woman who spent most of her life out of touch with her own desires and emotions.  The main character’s desire to live in the “happy lane” drove me a bit crazy as that kind of denial and diversion from real sorrow and grief isn’t a healthy way to live, though many employ those type of strategies.  Further, I found it nearly impossible to relate to the era, how men and women/husbands and wives related at that time, which again made it difficult to connect to the characters. Also, I found the book easy to put down as it was broken into unrelated sections and read like a journal rather than a narrative following a distinct plot arc (though the author clearly had things to communicate as she told the story of Carrie’s life). All in all, I would recommend this book for those who like biographies, journals and historical documentaries.  I wouldn’t recommend necessarily recommend this book if you are looking for an engaging fictional narrative story line as it moves slowly and has a slightly disjointed (journal-like) feel.

 

I received a free digital copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

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